Corporate Communication Tool Blackberry Joins Bank of America in Cyber-Hell .. What’s Next?

Corporate Communication Tool Blackberry Joins BOA in Cyber-Hell .. What’s Next?

A couple days ago Michael Redman published an article I wrote speculating that Bank of America’s website problems could be the result of hactivists, hacker-activists — including and especially Anonymous — engaged in a cyber-war with Bank of America.

There isn’t any firm evidence, but there is a lot of circumstantial evidence.  Anonymous announced in June they were beginning a campaign to target banks.  Bank of America’s web problems have been intermittently ongoing.

BOA’s excuse that this is a routine upgrade gone bad sounds stupid.  BOA has an army of exceptionally talented techies: if their bankers were as good as their techies they wouldn’t be a corporate welfare basket case.  Similarly, while Anonymous supports the non-violent Occupy Revolution, the group itself are hackers; they have repeatedly successfully attacked servers: the high-powered computers that run the world.

Neither Michael R., the owner of 4closurefraud.org, nor I heard from either the bank nor Anonymous to admit or deny this speculation.  That’s odd in itself; neither of them are publicity shy.  If there is a cyber-war people should preemptively move their money since it’d be irrational to keep one’s money in a war-zone.  That alone should cause BOA to definitively say “no .. here, with specificity, is what’s happening.”  Instead .. dead silence.

Now the problems have spread to the Blackberry network.  I switch back-and-forth between iPhone’s and Android’s.  Most people I know use one, the other, or regular smart phones.  An ever shrinking number of people use Blackberry’s.  Who still uses Blackberry’s?  Banks and other large corporations.  Blackberry’s are the preferred communication tool for the one-percent.

As I explained in my original article, I am a techie, not a solider.  But if I were going to start a war — and wanted to make it clear I was serious — I’d a) launch a successful attack against the largest fort my enemy had, to show any lesser one was vulnerable, and b) disrupt their primary means of communication.  We’re seeing both, timed with a non-violent (at least on the part of the protestors; the police have acted barbarically) and growing movement.

Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.  “… whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it.”  Fascists who cloak themselves in patriotic symbols conveniently forget the US was founded by a group of, well, rebels.

At 9:45AM, on Oct. 25, 1917, the Russian battleship Aurora fired a blank shot across the then Russian political capital of Petrograd, sending a message to Russians fed-up with economic injustice that it was time to take over.  Oct., 25 .. twelve days from now.  That revolution didn’t end well, though it radically transformed the world for over seventy years.

Despite rants from well-publicized defenders of the status quo I don’t know any American Socialists.  We admire our great inventors, like Steve Jobs, who earn their money by making life better for everybody.

But we’re not as dumb as they think.  We know the difference between a genuine inventor and a “financial innovator.”  That latter group “innovates” with Ponzi-schemes designed to drain the life-blood from the middle-class, unfunded insurance renamed “credit default swaps” that taxpayers pay out when the insured-for event happens (including taxpayer-funded bonuses for those who ran their businesses off a cliff), and derivatives that “spread the risk,” but in reality provide a good excuse that everything is too “interconnected” to allow the market to fail.

We’ve noticed the bailouts that enable reckless, incompetent bankers — who bribe corrupt politicians — to collect mortgages, student loans, and credit-card debts at face value when they should be broken financial institutions begging for any payment their former customers are willing to fork over for a few cents on the dollar.

Despite the lies it really was a choice of foreclosures in Manhattan, Greenwich, and Palm Beach Island, or foreclosures everywhere else.  Our politicians sold us out and made the wrong choice.

I’m not a conspiracy kook.  Even in the anti-foreclosure movement I focus on large sets of data to definitively prove patterns.  I’m unwilling to draw a conclusion until the evidence is overwhelming.  But I’ve seen enough patterns of misbehavior to finally say that this was a premeditated hit on the American public: on my children, my family, my neighbors, my grocer and shop owner .. on the people I interact with every day that make our country what it is, or at least what it’s supposed to be.

A growing mountain of circumstantial evidence continues to build that there’s a silent but very real American Revolution brewing or underway.  We’re waking up, finally.  Too many of us have taken the red pill, either by choice or because it was forced down our throats, and don’t like what we see.

Michael Olenick

~

4closureFraud.org

Comments
9 Responses to “Corporate Communication Tool Blackberry Joins Bank of America in Cyber-Hell .. What’s Next?”
  1. Randolph (Randy) Frodsham says:

    Though well said, I can only wonder if the author knows that the united States was founded as a democratic republic, not a democracy; of if the author understands the difference. I can state without any doubt whatsoever, that those citizens, educated undet the US Dept. of Education, have no clue unless they have taken it upon themselves to get an education. Hell, the alleged teachers don’t know the difference – they cannot impart knowledge they themselves don’t have.
    We need to be shown whether there has been violence elsewhere, or if the violence is unique to NYC.

    • Stupendous Man - Defender of Liberty, Foe of Tyranny says:

      You are correct in asserting that the US in not a democracy, however, are not necessarily correct in asserting it is a democratic republic. I have also seen it defined as a “constitutional republic,” or a “representative democracy.” Generally I refer to it as a constitutional republic (and at this point have no authoritative source for that – or rather don’t feel like digging one up right now).

      If you have an authoritative source please share with us. I WOULD like to see it.

      Addendum: Seems disingenuous of me to ask for a source, but not to provide one, so, Wikipedia offers the following. I’ll let others debate how authoritative that is (it was quick though).

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_system_of_government

      Regarding Mr. Olenicks comment of this having been intentional, I agree. While I haven’t crunched nearly as much data as he has I have seen other types of evidence in sufficient amount that I am also convinced it was premeditated. A few easy indicators are relatively recent changes in local statutes, the bankruptcy code, the UCC. One example of local statutes changing in my jurisdiction was a 2006 revision of the recording statute. Prior to 2006 it was required that an assignment of mortgage be recorded within 30 of the conveyance. This was changed by an additional subsection that says in essence “Ah, what the hell. You don’t have to record, and everything else in this statutory section is unimportant.” Do ya think they saw it coming? There are others as well that go back further.

      Do your research, draw your own conclusions.

      • Equity Free says:

        This is a good summary of the crises .

        This guy is one of about 20 people who made The Big Short on the housing bubble .

    • CaitlinO says:

      Sorry, but this seems like a deliberate diversion from a great essay. Whatever the US was supposed to be, what it is today is an oligarchy. Patriotic citizens are in the streets struggling to take the country back from the oligarchs.

    • Michael Olenick says:

      Yes, I’m well aware of the fact. If the oligarchs would like to clarify that we’re not a Democracy as a justification for their behavior — to explain to people they shouldn’t be accountable — I’m sure the American public would be happy to quickly patch up that ancient mistake.

      And thanks to everybody else who wrote in support. I just recommended to a friend to read orre-read Grapes of Wrath. It’s amazing how similar the scams and the suffering that were going on back then look like what’s going on now. Most people don’t even realize the book is about the human effect of foreclosures, focusing on abusive labor practices instead, a predicable by-product.

      Tough times tend to polarize American’s, bringing out the very best and the very worst. At our core we’re a nation of mostly good people though; the only industrialized country I know where our culture includes routinely smiling at and talking to strangers. It’s long past time we took our country back.

      • Stupendous Man - Defender of Liberty, Foe of Tyranny says:

        “Most people don’t even realize the book is about the human effect of foreclosures, focusing on abusive labor practices instead, a predicable by-product. ”

        An excellent point Michael.

      • Interesting you bring this book up. Just started listing to the ebook version the other day.

        M

  2. Katheryn says:

    Very Well Said!

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