National Archives Sued Over Financial Crisis Documents

 

National Archives Sued Over Financial Crisis Documents

It’s been 18 months since the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission (FCIC), the bipartisan group charged by Congress with discovering the causes of the 2008 financial meltdown, released its final report (PDF). At the time, the commissioners promised that many of the documents the FCIC gathered during its investigation—including testimony from bank officials and internal bank emails and memos—would “eventually be made public.” But the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), which holds the documents, has so far refused to release many of them, saying that it has put a five-year restriction on their release. “Eventually,” it turns out, means half a decade.

Cause of Action, a Washington transparency watchdog that filed a Freedom of Information Act request seeking the FCIC documents last year, thinks the American public should not have to wait that long. Late Tuesday, the group sued NARA in federal court in Washington, DC, aiming to force the disclosure of thousands of pages of as-yet-unreleased documents.

Rest here…

Copy of the suit below…

~

4closureFraud.org

~

Cause of Action Nara Fcic Lawsuit

Comments
One Response to “National Archives Sued Over Financial Crisis Documents”
  1. Ken Hansen says:

    Refused to release potentially incriminating documents? “Openness” has been called one of the best weapons in a Democracy. There is no way to hold anyone accountable when officials attempt to claim a right to secrecy. Should we simply trust what they say? That this is some how acceptable?

Leave a Reply