Well, Wouldn’t Ya Know… PBC Clerk Sharon Bock’s Office Criminal Arrest Reveals Probe Focused on 1,000-Plus Stolen Oxycodone Pills from Evidence Department

The Palm Beach Post should be ashamed of themselves for suppressing this information until after the election.

We all knew that something was going on but did not have enough hard evidence (no pun intended) to go public…

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West Palm Beach woman’s arrest reveals clerk’s office probe focused on 1,000-plus missing oxycodone pills

More than 1,000 stolen oxycodone pills are at the center of a criminal investigation into Palm Beach County Clerk and Comptroller Sharon Bock’s evidence department, according to sheriff’s deputies.

This was just one of several new details from the closely guarded investigation that emerged in a probable-cause affidavit released Tuesday, the day after Palm Beach County Sheriff’s deputies arrested evidence clerk Renee Lyn Hawkins on three unrelated drug possession charges. Deputies released her Monday after she posted bond, and Bock’s office fired her Tuesday morning.

Bock’s office confirmed that Hawkins, 32, of suburban West Palm Beach, was one of the three clerks under criminal investigation within the department charged with storing and maintaining guns, drugs and other crucial evidence in Palm Beach County court cases. All three had been suspended since July 2, but Bock allowed the other two clerks to return to work this week.

“It’s a very big disappointment,” Un Cha Kim, chief operating officer of the Clerk & Comptroller’s Office, said of Hawkins dismissal Tuesday. “We invest a lot in our employees once we hire them, and when something like this happens, our whole office suffers because we take pride in serving our customers. We take it personally that we somehow failed you guys.”

According to the two-page affidavit in Hawkins’ case, deputies confronted Hawkins at the courthouse just before 6 p.m., June 29 and asked her if she had the stolen oxycodone pills in her purse. She said no and denied any involvement in the alleged thefts.

Rest from the PB Post here…

Be sure to check it out and comment here…

You just really can’t make this shit up…

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4closureFraud.org

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2012 Florida Statutes

Title XLVI
CRIMES
Chapter 893
DRUG AB– USE PREVENTION AND CONTROL
View Entire Chapter

893.135 Trafficking; mandatory sentences; suspension or reduction of sentences; conspiracy to engage in trafficking.

Any person who knowingly sells, purchases, manufactures, delivers, or brings into this state, or who is knowingly in actual or constructive possession of, 4 grams or more of any morphine, opium, oxycodone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, or any salt, derivative, isomer, or salt of an isomer thereof, including heroin, as described in s. 893.03(1)(b), (2)(a), (3)(c)3., or (3)(c)4., or 4 grams or more of any mixture containing any such substance, but less than 30 kilograms of such substance or mixture, commits a felony of the first degree, which felony shall be known as “trafficking in illegal drugs,” punishable as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084. If the quantity involved:

a. Is 4 grams or more, but less than 14 grams, such person shall be sentenced to a mandatory minimum term of imprisonment of 3 years, and the defendant shall be ordered to pay a fine of $50,000.
b. Is 14 grams or more, but less than 28 grams, such person shall be sentenced to a mandatory minimum term of imprisonment of 15 years, and the defendant shall be ordered to pay a fine of $100,000.
c. Is 28 grams or more, but less than 30 kilograms, such person shall be sentenced to a mandatory minimum term of imprisonment of 25 calendar years and pay a fine of $500,000.

2. Any person who knowingly sells, purchases, manufactures, delivers, or brings into this state, or who is knowingly in actual or constructive possession of, 30 kilograms or more of any morphine, opium, oxycodone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, or any salt, derivative, isomer, or salt of an isomer thereof, including heroin, as described in s. 893.03(1)(b), (2)(a), (3)(c)3., or (3)(c)4., or 30 kilograms or more of any mixture containing any such substance, commits the first degree felony of trafficking in illegal drugs. A person who has been convicted of the first degree felony of trafficking in illegal drugs under this subparagraph shall be punished by life imprisonment and is ineligible for any form of discretionary early release except pardon or executive clemency or conditional medical release under s. 947.149. However, if the court determines that, in addition to committing any act specified in this paragraph:

a. The person intentionally killed an individual or counseled, commanded, induced, procured, or caused the intentional killing of an individual and such killing was the result; or
b. The person’s conduct in committing that act led to a natural, though not inevitable, lethal result,

such person commits the capital felony of trafficking in illegal drugs, punishable as provided in ss. 775.082 and 921.142. Any person sentenced for a capital felony under this paragraph shall also be sentenced to pay the maximum fine provided under subparagraph 1.

3. Any person who knowingly brings into this state 60 kilograms or more of any morphine, opium, oxycodone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, or any salt, derivative, isomer, or salt of an isomer thereof, including heroin, as described in s. 893.03(1)(b), (2)(a), (3)(c)3., or (3)(c)4., or 60 kilograms or more of any mixture containing any such substance, and who knows that the probable result of such importation would be the death of any person, commits capital importation of illegal drugs, a capital felony punishable as provided in ss. 775.082 and 921.142. Any person sentenced for a capital felony under this paragraph shall also be sentenced to pay the maximum fine provided under subparagraph 1.

Comments
9 Responses to “Well, Wouldn’t Ya Know… PBC Clerk Sharon Bock’s Office Criminal Arrest Reveals Probe Focused on 1,000-Plus Stolen Oxycodone Pills from Evidence Department”
  1. John Anderson says:

    It may be interesting to note that about 10 years ago the FBI did a inventory of property/evidence room’s of 50 police dept’s and found that on average, half of the drugs that were supposed to be there were missing.
    Oxycodone is a very addictive drug whose misuse kills more people than heroin and cocaine combined.
    That being said, now that prescription drugs kill more people than illegal drugs, we should review our laws.
    Seeing that we can not keep drugs out of prison’s much less the streets, we need to change our drug laws.
    These laws and policies are responsible for the over 1 million people of the 2 million we currently have in prison’s, and the over 50 thousand drug related deaths in Mexico.
    As a former Deputy Sheriff I support Law Enforcement Against Prohibition “LEAP” , that favors regulation vs the currant drug war.
    We should start with marijuana that 56% of Americans feel should be decriminalized then work toward all drug laws being repealed. Remember that prior to 1913 there were no drug laws.
    Drug use will never be and excuse for breaking the law, just as alcohol use is not.
    A lot of people tell me that there would be a lot of deaths from overdoses, and I reply “And that is the price of freedom” The people who die will be a warning to people not to use, but if they do, not to abuse drugs.
    http://www.leap.cc/

  2. chitown2020 says:

    They may all need to get a lot more of those when the American people take their country back from these scoundrels.

  3. Fury says:

    the voters of palm beach co. should have had this information BEFORE the election.
    the palm beach post should not have concealed this info from the voters.

    stealing oxycontin pales in comparison to stealing homes using fraudulent documents.

    bock is not in control of her office.

  4. Collene says:

    It just goes to show you the unethical world we live in. All this info should have been public knowledge to prevent another corrupt official from getting into office. They can deal the drugs out of the homes they have stolen from homeowners.

  5. Equity Free says:

    I heard this news was held back from the media by PBC officials until after the election .
    Surprise, surprise .

  6. Mario Kenny says:

    What does the clerk do for the Palm Beach Post to affords her such cover?

  7. Laura says:

    Some sleazball drug dealer will get a cruddy lawyer to get them off because Palm Beach can’t keep their evidence tamper proof. This unprofessional handling of evidence harms the whole judicial system. All evidence can be brought into question in all cases, such as rape, murder, assault. This is a huge insult to victims of crimes, and all residents of the county. Bock needs to be fired.

  8. Laura says:

    The woman runs a real tight ship. You have to ask what else is missing or tampered with and how valid is the chain of evidence or how valid are public records in Palm Beach.

  9. The companies that make these painkillers know that a large chunk of their products end up being misused, but they won’t help stop it when they’re racking in the profits from it.

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