Sen. Blumenthal and Rep. Ellison Introduce the Permanently Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act of 2015

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Sen. Blumenthal and Rep. Ellison Introduce the Permanently Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act of 2015

WASHINGTONSen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) and Rep. Keith Ellison (D-MN) introduced the Permanently Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act of 2015 (H.R. 1354) today. The bill ensures expired federal protections for renters living in foreclosed properties are renewed.

“Families who pay their rent and play by the rules should not be evicted simply because their landlord fails to pay his mortgage,” Sen. Blumenthal said.  “This measure is necessary to protect tenants from eviction when their landlord defaults.  The Act that protected them previously expired in 2014, so tenants may now be evicted, inexplicably and inexcusably when the building owner faces foreclosure.  As a matter of common sense and basic fairness, families should be spared life on the street when landlords shirk their obligations.”

“When a building owner falls into foreclosure, people who live in the property may be forced out—even if they’ve paid their rent in full and on time,” Ellison said. “It’s wrong that families face homelessness because the owner of the property where they live failed to make payments on time. The Permanently Protecting Tenants in Foreclosure Act ensures families have the time they need to find new housing.”

“The PTFA provides critical protection to innocent renter families whose homes have been foreclosed.  PTFA is an important tool, especially now, given the significant national shortage of rental housing,” said National Housing Law Project Executive Director Marcia Rosen.

“Without federal protections in place, many renters in foreclosed properties are vulnerable to summary eviction and homelessness. In nearly half the states, these renters can be evicted with five days’ notice or less, through no fault of their own,” said National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty Executive Director Maria Foscarinis.

“We are grateful to Senator Blumenthal and Representative Ellison for introducing this crtical legislation to protect renters when their landlords’ properties go into foreclosure. We hope Congress acts swiftly to enact these protections,” said Sheila Crowley, President and CEO for National Low Income Housing Coalition.

While much of the response to the foreclosure crisis has focused on homeowners, 27% of properties and 40% of the units in foreclosure are estimated to be renter-occupied. These renters often have no idea that their landlord has fallen behind on mortgage payments, and usually have continued to pay their rent even as their landlord has failed to pay the mortgage. Prior to the passage of the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act (PTFA) in May 2009, tenants were often required to move with as little as a few days-notice. The law ensured that most tenants can stay in their home for the remainder of their lease or for at least 90 days post-foreclosure.

But Congress did not extend the PTFA and it expired on December 31, 2014. The Permanently Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act of 2015 makes the law permanent. 

The Permanently Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act of 2015 is co-sponsored by:  Reps. G.K. Butterfield, Michael Capuano, Katherine Clark, Elijah Cummings, Al Green, Raul Grijalva, Hank Johnson, Alcee L. Hastings, Rubén Hinojosa, Marci Kaptur, Jim Langevin, Barbara Lee, John Lewis, Stephen Lynch, Carolyn B. Maloney, James P. McGovern, Gregory Meeks, Gwen Moore, Eleanor Holmes Norton, Mark Pocan, Louise Slaughter, Adam Smith, Mark Takano and Maxine Waters.

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source: http://ellison.house.gov

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Comments
4 Responses to “Sen. Blumenthal and Rep. Ellison Introduce the Permanently Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act of 2015”
  1. This measure is necessary to protect tenants from eviction when their landlord defaults. The Act that protected them previously expired in 2014, so tenants may now be evicted, inexplicably and inexcusably when the building owner faces foreclosur

  2. rinkmom6 says:

    It would of been nice after 23 years and almost done raising 6 boys someone would of protected us from the banks Fraud (B of A) but instead what it appears to all these kids who have been evicted with their parents is that everyone that should of protected us from law enforcement, to the courts, to lawyers who didn’t get what was going on and all the way up the chain of all these government agency’s, and no one helped.Everything we worked for all those years was taken,thieves stole most of our personal property, wash machine,dryer, shed,power tools lawn mower motorcycles and on and on and trashing the property and when we caught them and called the cops we were told they didn’t care the only ones hat weren’t allowed to be there was us and if we weren’t gone in 2 minutes we would all go to jail.Isn’t that nice to tell kids that have been told they could trust cops to help??And in addition the agent sold whatever personal property online for$ 300.00 before we had the chance to get anything including are tax returns, social security cards, kids birth cert.Because they claimed once the bank foreclosed ( HAD STOLEN) the property we had no rights.We had never been renters so why would I know what happens in an eviction??My husband should of retired last year, there’s no starting over again…

  3. BOBBI SWANN says:

    Let’s protect the renters and forget about the protection of those who ARE NOT renters and losing their homes! This sucks that they would pay THAT much attention to persons who never paid for the insurance, appraisal, taxes, upkeep like those homeowner’s who got booted out of their homes. And so what if the Republican Congress doesn’t pass this? It’s like having a neon sign that says “hey renters, c’mon over to the renting side where you have all the protection that home ownership does not”. Sickening and sad.

  4. Ingrid says:

    this has little chance to pass as the Republican Congress is obsessed with stopping Obama on everything and they have little time for anything else.

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