“Critics within the industry, such as Frank LLosa, a lawyer and broker in Northern Virginia, called such fees “bogus” and “designed to confuse the customer and ultimately charge them more.””

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High court says ‘unearned’ fees charged by lenders and other service providers do not violate U.S. law

In a decision that could have significant effects on the fees that consumers pay in real estate transactions, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that “unearned” fees charged by lenders and other service providers do not violate federal law as long as they are not split with anyone else.

The court’s unanimous decision effectively reopens the door to controversial “administrative” fees levied by real estate brokers, and could encourage the marking-up of fees by mortgage lenders, settlement agents and others, a practice that had been banned by federal regulators for the past decade.

In a decision that could have significant effects on the fees that consumers pay in real estate transactions, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that “unearned” fees charged by lenders and other service providers do not violate federal law as long as they are not split with anyone else.

The court’s unanimous decision effectively reopens the door to controversial “administrative” fees levied by real estate brokers, and could encourage the marking-up of fees by mortgage lenders, settlement agents and others, a practice that had been banned by federal regulators for the past decade.

Rest here…

Copy of the ruling below…

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4closureFraud.org

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Freeman v. Quicken Loans

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